A launch and a sigh of relief

Any time we do anything for the first time, we must be vulnerable and risk trying something, possibly doing it badly. Then we can continue to practice and improve. This is how it works with any new skill. And when you teach, you have an audience. It helps when your audience is forgiving, because you are bound to make mistakes.

While I have taught before via slides and conference calls, it has typically been to deliver conceptual (non-embodied) learning, not with a practice component. Yesterday I launched my first online yoga class, Thursday Slow Flow. Despite some issues with the sound quality (which will be fixed when I receive my headset) it felt like a success to me.

sacred space at the studio
Healing Within Acupuncture & Wellness Studio – practice space

As of 9 a.m. that morning, I had only one student signed up for the class. But four hours later (~90 minutes before class), there were 7 students ready to attend. I realized the majority of my students did what I do. They wait until the day of class, and then register that day for a class that is the right fit. In this “new era” this makes so much sense to me.

We must be present to what our body is calling for that day, and in the moment. We do not know if a child may have a schedule change at school, or an emergency will require our attention, or a work project may be dropped into our laps. And that’s okay. We must be flexible, to stay loose and to shift and move as new information comes in.

I breathed a sigh of relief and joy as my class came to a close. My verbal cues had helped people focus on their bodies and their internal experience, rather than staring at a screen. Several students indicated they felt more relaxed and grounded afterward. To me, if I can help anyone achieve that, it feels like success.

What new thing are you willing to try in service to others who need and want what you offer? If you believe your gifts can benefit someone, isn’t it worth the discomfort and vulnerability to show up?

cristy@meximinnesotana.com

No time like the present

There is no time like the present.

Actually that’s the only time there is, this present moment. The past exists in your mind as memory. The future only exists in your imagination.

Times like these make that all the more clear to me. The only actions we can take are in the present.

No Time Like the Present

True, we can plan for the future. But our ideas about the future are only a guess. In February, did anyone plan for not being able to get to the gym for a month starting March 17th?

I had to laugh at the U.S. President’s remarks on Wednesday. (Otherwise I would cry. Really.) He’s acting like we can and should “start-up” the economy again just like re-booting a computer. He actually thinks he is in control of the virus and the economy! Wow.

You and I know that is absurd and dangerous.  It becomes all the more clear that when the ego (i.e. left-brained “me-oriented” mental chatter) drives the world, disaster is the result.

Surrender to this moment. Do only the next relevant thing.

The next moment will take care of itself. And you will calm yourself by breathing, not trying to imagine EVERY possible scenario at once.

Think of Dorothy, who said “there’s no place like home.” And close your eyes, feel your feet on the floor, or your butt in a chair and say:

“There’s no time like the present.” Then live your life, one moment, and one breath at a time. Humanity is resilient. You are no exception.

Love you all,

cristy@meximinnesota.com

 

Since change is a constant

I started out today writing about some hints for people who are managing people remotely during the COVID-19 situation. In my role as an operations manager for remote clinical research team, I learned a lot about managing distributed teams. My direct reports were in 5 different countries, so we were seldom all together EXCEPT via teleconferences.

And then: I got news that my friend’s mother is dying. She’s getting on a plane soon in hopes she can say goodbye in person if her Mom is released to hospice care. Family members cannot visit people in hospitals right now. Oh dear. Complicated.

So the earlier idea has been shelved for later. For now, I will readjust my plans for the week, so I can cat-sit for her.

That is okay. Haven’t we shown how capable we are this week of re-adjusting? That we are not in control of so many events in our lives? 

Change is a Constant

Change in our lives has always been constant. And yet we, as humans, cling to our ways of doing things, our comfortable routines. As a neurodiverse person I struggle to maintain routines, though I know that they help me stay sane on the average day.

Meditation has been a daily practice for over 3 years now.  Wow, am I ever glad I made that commitment. Journaling is also a daily practice for me, removing the “static” from my head and getting some distance from it by writing it out. Anything we can to do help manage our emotions right now is important.

I practice yoga 10-15 minutes most days to calm my nervous system. Some days I take whole hour class online through Tula Yoga & Wellness! I’m grateful they are making classes available via Zoom for those of us who want to stay connected and practicing. I’m also delighted that my NIA teacher Beth Giles is offering her NIA classes via Zoom so I can vary things up! Moving to music is a balm for the soul.

We need to take care of ourselves. This is not something I will sacrifice during this time. Self-care helps me show up for others. I have been able to support friends and family who are struggling via phone calls, walks, emails, etc. Connection is essential for health. What if we tried “virtual presencing” while we do our social distancing? No, it’s not the same. And yes, we need it.

We humans are inherently resilient. It is how our brains evolved thus far. We will get through this together. And our community may grow even stronger as a result.

Stay well, friends.

cristy@meximinnesotana.com