Conscious evolution

Happy Wednesday, friends!

I usually write my midweek blog on a Tuesday night and schedule it to pre-post at a specific time each day. But this week, with my “Embody the Leader” course (session 3 of 4 tonight) for my group of young women, I wanted to spend time on that instead. So I gave myself a pass to not post a blog at the usual time.

Then I realized it was a full moon, and I also had a lot of other things to do.  Since my husband is gone for a 10-day motorcycle adventure with his friend Ben, I opted for some meditation in the moonlight. Last Thursday I had meditated outside to get my feet on the earth and I was visited by a deer, not 100 feet away from me.

Doe a deer

This gentle presence seemed curious about me, sitting quite still in a small park just outside our town home. She kept edging closer. Twilight was approaching, so the mosquitoes were making themselves known. But I kept fairly still, watching her as a focal point of my meditation.

She seemed to have a subtle message for me, and I am interpreting the feeling that washed over me in that experience. She seemed to hold me and regard me as just a part of her world. And in that moment, I saw myself as both just a tiny part of the world, and the whole world at once.

It occurred to me that we all evolve constantly. Sometimes I feel I have to strive toward that evolution. Other times I realize that it is bound to happen, this internal evolution, if we pay attention. All we need to do is be present to our lives, be present to the wonder and the beauty all around us, and yes, also to the pain.

It is not about efforting or striving to get somewhere. It is about fully knowing ourselves, and knowing our humanity. It is about fully accepting ourselves as we are in whatever part of our journey we are in. There is no hurry. This is the most important work of our lives. When we know ourselves, we begin to sense and feel our true purpose in the world. And in that process, we feel a joy and lightness that is like no other feeling.

I am so grateful for the experiences of YTT and other circles of women especially, that have brought me to this wisdom.

cristy@meximinnesotana.com

 

Saturday Share – World Meditation Day, Munch Style — thesecretblind

Some have suggested that Munch the Dogi has yoga and meditation down to a fine art. If you celebrated World Mediation Day on 21st May with some Zen and blissed out way of being by meditating, you will appreciate Munch’s take on his favourite past time. If you are new to meditation, Munch has kindly […]

via World Meditation Day, Munch Style — thesecretblind

Oh my goodness I love this so much. Many of you know I like to write about meditation and yoga. Here’s a fresh and original take on the theme. Hope you enjoy. Happy Memorial Day weekend!

cristy@meximinnesotana.com

Resilience workshop

On Monday I had the honor of sharing some favorite meditation practices during a workshop on the Neuroscience of Resilience with an engaged group of job-seekers. When we are in times of transition or challenge, being able to engage our parasympathetic nervous system to calm the body is key. We can bring a sense of equanimity and balance to decisions and actions we take.

resilient tree
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The group was excellent. They participated readily, brought their perspectives into the room and asked great questions. I really enjoyed pulling together the presentation and materials for this session. I had in mind the struggle of being between jobs and careers, and I know this can be a place of uncertainty and stress. It can also be a place of discovery and growth, should we choose to embrace that side of the process.

It takes self-compassion to remain resilient in the face of challenges or struggles. Those of us who have harsh inner critics can feel as though we need to “reprogram” ourselves in a way. Self-criticism can be so habitual that it feels automatic. But when we access that higher self, that inner mentor, and allow ourselves some kindness, paradoxically we find it easier to take actions and move forward.

This group is able to tap the resources of Career Partners International, so they are fortunate to have support during their transition. I hope I was able to add to their toolkit of resources to help them along the journey. What a great privilege it is to be able to share on a topic I have studied for so many years for my own benefit, and on behalf of the teams I have led.

I am humbled and grateful.

cristy@meximinnesotana.com

 

 

 

TBT – Inviting yourself back

This is an edited post originally written in April 2018. It is even more relevant as I learn to embody these concepts through soma yoga, and coach using somatic awareness as a tool for accessing inner wisdom.

One of my favorite meditations from Insight Timer is by Anna Guest-Jelly called “May I Know What I Know.” It involves a body scan in which we are moved through body starting with the feet, and moving through each region. After the exercise, we consider if there are any places we could not feel, that may have been “offline” from our awareness, so to speak.

emotions body
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The more I practice this body awareness and deliberately tune into places in the body that may be mysterious, the more I tune into my emotions. Sometimes I realize why there are “frozen” parts – those emotions may be difficult ones, like grief or anger.

I am still learning to feel those emotions all the way through, and sit with them without trying to escape. It is an exercise in compassion and patience to realize I have habitually escaped those feelings, or pushed them under with distraction, food, or other buffers (like busy-ness or overwork) rather than to be still with them.

Now that I realize these feelings are an important emotional compass, I have begun to “invite myself back” more often. I tune into that channel – my gut, my shoulders, my back, sometimes my lower spine, when they are trying to tell me something. Rather than get lost in thought, and spinning mental energy, I aim to come back to the body, invite my whole self back.

This tendency to abandon the body and thus abandon ourselves is promoted by our culture. Feeling our emotions and tuning into our intuition often dismissed. But as I do it more, I acknowledge the many times when I have buried my own desires in favor of pleasing other people.

caring
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Women are well-conditioned to attend to others’ needs. We take care of partners, children, bosses, teammates, even parents sometimes. But we do not always attend to our own bodies, our own yearnings. I inadvertently learned (from family and culture) that I should ignore my own needs in favor of taking care of others. This abandonment does not serve us long-term though.

Even the airlines tell us to put on our own mask before helping others. Inviting ourselves back can feel like a radical act of rebellion for women. Patriarchy demands we attend to the comfort of our family members, remain small and and of service, never demanding anything for ourselves. And yes, I think it is patriarchy that promotes this idea of the “good daughter” and it is one we must dismantle.

When we invite ourselves back, we ground ourselves in our truth. We allow ourselves to live in greater harmony with nature, and with our bodies. We begin to understand the connected nature of all people, of all parts of the universe. We feel compassion for ourselves and for others in their struggles. We make different choices that are more sustainable for ourselves. We serve others with a spirit of generosity rather than resentment.

Inviting ourselves back means we set appropriate boundaries. We say no to things that do not align with our purpose or intention. That can be very hard for those of us who were trained to say “yes” to everything we are asked to do. We can be perceived as “uppity” or trouble-makers, or not those nice girls we used to be.

It is a daily practice, inviting ourselves back. It does not simply happen one day, and then all things change. It is a conscious choice, a habit that grows easier with regular practice. If we want to make sustainable change in the world, I believe it is non-negotiable. The world needs our whole and integrated selves. Our souls call for this as well.

Consider inviting yourself back today. Center on what your body is telling you. See what emerges as you learn to pay attention in this way.

cristy@meximinnesotana.com

On loving our learning

I just completed my first intensive 3-day weekend of yoga teacher training for the 200-hour certification program through Yoga North. It was an amazing experience, with excellent teachers and 19 students in our class. Women from all walks of life, from one junior in high school to a few of us in our 40’s, maybe even 1-2 women their 50’s.

Most of us have practiced yoga in classes for years, but we now decided to make this commitment to deepen our study and our practices. I am so grateful for all of them, and for the wonderful teachers that filled the weekend with opportunities for practice along with giving us very clear and direct instruction.

yoga book collage
I get to read all these great resources! This is a sampling of our homework for month 1 (of 6).

Soma Yoga Therapy is a bit different than “traditional” hatha or vinyasa yoga styles. It is based on Thomas Hanna’s Somatics, Therapeutic Yoga practices and Classic Asana (poses). The principles are 1) to learn to pay attention, 2) build better habits, 3) progress responsibly, progress well, and 4) stay current – self-actualize.

I love that we challenge some of the traditional ways that people are instructed in yoga, ways that can often result in injury when people practice incorrectly or with poor form. Paying attention to the alignment of the spine and the pelvis are fundamental to Soma Yoga, and the poses are cued to help the student with proper alignment each time.

The idea is that we can help people maintain functional movement for the entirety of their lives. This includes while we are reaching for things or bending to pick things up, or having to sit at a desk all day, or looking back while driving, etc. These are all movements we do not want to lose as we get older. But sometimes our joints, muscles and fascia lose flexibility as we age because of habitual patterns.

I am so fascinated by what we are learning. On the first day after the first intensive weekend, I have already done about a quarter of the homework for the month. I am so excited to learn more. I am sure to post more as I learn, discover and practice in new ways.

Cheers,

cristy@meximinnesotana.com

 

 

Connecting women

There is powerful energy created when women with similar journeys and struggles connect and share stories with each other. It is a combination of relief and joy when we realize we are not alone.

connecting women
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I witnessed this in my learning circle on Monday night, and I was inspired to consider how fascinating it is that we connected, and all of our commonalities. I am also pondering how best to facilitate some practices that can help us stay grounded and centered along the journey.

Of course, y’all know I’m an evangelist for meditation and yoga, so we will explore some simple practices that I have found to be particularly helpful. I am also requesting that they commit to some small daily action, with the support of the group, to help build and maintain their ability to show up at their best, at home, work or in the community.

Since this is the first time I have offered this series, we will see where it goes. But for now, I am so honored and grateful that these amazing women have elected to join me in staying open to learning practices that will support their growth.

Onward,

cristy@meximinnesotana.com