Stand down, Mr. President

As I write this, I balk at using the title “president.” Technically you hold this title, Donald, though you are anything BUT presidential.

I heard on NPR and in the local papers that you are coming to Rochester, Minnesota for a rally on Friday.

Why?

We do not support you. Please stand down, and stay away from our state.

The irony is not lost on us that you are visiting Rochester, the home of the Mayo Clinic, where outstanding medical professionals and scientists provide outstanding care to patients, while contributing to the advancement of science.

Scientists…you scoffed at a recent rally. Joe Biden will listen to the scientists, whom you have mocked repeatedly.

You are a disgraceful person, and you are not a leader. Your casual disdain for the health of Americans disqualifies you for this role. Science has saved your life, and yet you discredit it.

When you fail to protect the citizens to whom you have sworn an oath, you fail our nation. When your presence in our communities becomes a threat to public health, you must stand down.

Mayor Kim Norton of Rochester has expressed her concern about your visit, noting that the communities and states around the area are currently a hotbed for COVID and that your campaign will be bussing people in. This is irresponsible and reflects a disdain for health and for life.

The bulk of the COVID cases in the community of Bemidji in October were directly traced to your campaign rally in September. Your failure to take this illness seriously endangers all health care workers serving our communities.

We are so eager to send you home, Donald. You exhaust us. You anger us. You sow destruction and anxiety in the places you visit.

Minnesotans will speak loudly and clearly at the polls. I certainly hope you will keep your pledge not to visit the states where you have lost. If you never visit us again, it will be too soon.

Sincerely,

cristy@meximinnesotana.com

Why did it happen this way?

It did not have to happen this way. But a lack of competent leadership will do that. The U.S. has about a quarter of the worldwide COVID-19 cases. This puts “we’re number one” in a new light, no?

Daily cases July 16, 2020
Snapshot from Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center 7/16/2020

Don’t do it for yourself. Masks are not worn to protect you. Masks are worn to protect your community from small micro droplets that are released when you talk, cough or sneeze.

They don’t protect people completely, but they do slow the spread. And the main reason we want to slow the spread is so that hospitals are able to deal with the influx of cases. Also, maybe some of us care about human life and dignity.

My sister is a nurse. I don’t want her to have to deal with the results (y)our carelessness. Rural hospitals do not have the supplies that leaders claimed they would have. They must reuse the supplies they have. This is not a good situation.

Humans have difficulty with exponents. We think in linear ways, so these “hockey stick” curves work are not easily grasped. We saw this with the last big recession in 2008-2009. One minute it seemed things were fine: everyone was making money on flipping houses. And the next minute: financial disaster. Some saw the signs and warned us. But most people partied until they got laid off.

I get it. Or I try to be patient anyway.

Things don’t become serious until they are, well, SERIOUS. 

With nearly 14 million cases as of this writing, and almost 600,000 deaths so far attributed to this virus, one might think we could get a clue.

I know this is a rant.

I try to be more measured than this most days. My anger and disgust at the self-centered behavior I keep seeing, particularly in national leadership, is usually something I control. I’m a yoga teacher, for cripes sake. I meditate daily.

And yet.

My rage at incompetent leaders. Cannot. Be. Contained. Some days.

Wear your mask, wash your hands, keep your distances when possible. 

Your community thanks you for thinking beyond yourself.

***

cristy@meximinnesotana.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Going all Sinéad over here?

Taking a departure from my Wellness Wednesday tradition for a mundane topic. It is actually related to wellness. But it’s about hair.

I am pretty sure I’m not the only person to be getting a little bushy up here, without my lovely Nicole Schreifels, the only person I trust with my hair. She always does a wonderful job and I walk away feeling cared for and sassy.

It is clear from the increasing numbers of COVID-19 cases that this “Stay At Home” situation is not going to end (safely) any time soon. The number of cases in the U.S. continues to climb rapidly. While I think Minnesota may fare better than some states, we must still use caution to protect vulnerable people.

Sinead discogs
Photo source link 

A dear yoga sister of mine told me Tuesday that she probably has the virus. She was advised by her tele-medicine practitioner that she could not get tested unless she went to ICU. With a severe and painful cough, fever, chills, and a loss of smell and taste, she was told to stay home and to self-quarantine for 7 days without the option of testing.

To me, this indicates a few things:

1) The actual numbers of infected people are MUCH higher than the confirmed cases reported (which include mostly hospitalized patients).

2) This is going to get worse before it gets better. How much worse? Nobody knows.

3) Despite many warnings from public health officials in recent decades that this type of event was probable, leaders ignored the warnings. They did not take time to understand the science to protect people. We need to listen to the experts, not the politicians.

4) Because infection rates increase in logarithmic progressions rather than linear ones, it is hard for us all to comprehend the nature of the spread. So, in a free society such as ours, we have difficulty complying with the kinds of orders that can slow the spread.

What does this have to do with hair? Well, wouldn’t it give a virus a lot less surface area to attach and inadvertently get into eyes or nose if I shave it all off? I mean, it’s short now already. As I washed my hands for the 20th+ time today, and brushed the hair out of my eyes, I considered a shampoo bottle and thought: wouldn’t be easier just to unburden myself further?

I don’t have the delicate features and symmetrical head shape of Sinead O’Connor, so I doubt I can pull it off personally. But in the interest of public health, why not at least ask the question?

Stay safe and well, friends.

cristy@meximinnesotana.com

 

Workplace Wellness – from Gallup

This week I am going a little “light” on the writing. I am preparing for YTT weekend number 5, and trying to get set up for a good experience.

I read an article from Gallup New entitled: Your Boss Could Be Bad — or Good — for your Health. I decided I really must share it, because Gallup is reputable organization that does good and validated research. Someday maybe toxic workplaces will be considered a public health risk.

This article focuses on the value of trust in workplaces. This is something I always want to promote, trust and trust-worthiness among my teams and colleagues. The Gallup article explains why.

boss Gallup article
Straight stolen from the Gallup article

If you are not working in a place that feels safe, and that values your strengths, consider working with a coach to help you find alternatives to your current situation. My own coach (Elizabeth) helped me see how my values need to be represented in my work setting in order to feel fulfilled each day.

Wow, am I ever glad she was there to help me articulate those ideas in a new way. It has helped me see what I need to feel happy and well.

Have a wonderful “hump” day! Enjoy the midweek and mid-summer.

cristy@meximinnesotana.com